You can train a hen to crow but it is probably easier to hire a rooster: Past behaviour is the best predictor of future behaviour

The recruitment industry has a saying: “you can train a hen to crow but it is probably easier to hire a rooster”. Perhaps this is also applicable to the adoption of self-care  practices and reduction of burnout experienced by OoHC/YJ workers, i.e. perhaps we should recruit people who already undergo self-care practices or are resilient to burnout. The results The…

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How to reduce burnout in OoHC & YJ staff (Part 1): Improve supervision

This is the penultimate post in the series that reviews the evidence for prevention of burnout in OoHC and YJ workers. This and the next post will attempt to summarise ‘what works’ in preventing burnout. The results The previous studies (click here and here) suggest that self-care and trauma-informed self-care strategies have a positive effect, but do not impact on…

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Does Trauma Informed Self Care Reduce Worker Burnout?

  This peer reviewed study examines the impact of a program titled Trauma Informed Self Care (TISC) on compassion satisfaction, secondary trauma and burnout in child welfare workers in the US (i.e. child protection workers in Australia). Workers’ propensity to engage in self-care activities was assessed using a 14-item self-report instrument called Trauma Informed Self Care (TISC) – see sidebar.…

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Self-care strategies: can they be taught?

Summary of this peer reviewed study1 Residential, foster care and juvenile justice workers are subject to considerable stress in their roles, therefore the sector experiences high turnover. It has long been suggested that improved self-care will result in less stressed workers, less turnover and less burnout (resulting in fewer Workcover claims). This US study investigates how frequently child welfare staff…

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