You can train a hen to crow but it is probably easier to hire a rooster: Past behaviour is the best predictor of future behaviour

The recruitment industry has a saying: “you can train a hen to crow but it is probably easier to hire a rooster”. Perhaps this is also applicable to the adoption of self-care  practices and reduction of burnout experienced by OoHC/YJ workers, i.e. perhaps we should recruit people who already undergo self-care practices or are resilient to burnout. The results The…

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Sensorimotor Psychotherapy: Highlights from the Childhood Trauma Conference (Day 1)

I am at the 3rd International Childhood International Trauma Conference in Melbourne. The conference brings together international leaders in the field of trauma and trauma recovery. The aim is to distill information that might be relevant to Practitioners be they foster carers, resi-worker workers, case managers or JJ workers etc. A big task!  The conference runs for five and half…

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Absconding from placements increases risk of contact with correctional systems Practitioners have long known that young people who abscond from placement are at increased risk. Academics from the University of Michigan in the United States have completed an interesting study looking at the relationship between absconding and entry into the juvenile and adult correctional justice systems. The study compared a…

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Practitioners who work with high-risk adolescents (HRA) often wonder who such adolescents turn to for help in times of crisis. A recent Israeli study looked at the differing reasons HRAs seek help from youth workers versus others, e.g. parents, peers and teachers. Youth workers are defined as workers in non-mainstream educational settings, which specialise in dealing with adolescents at risk.…

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Making the latest research accessible to Out of Home Care and Youth Justice Practitioners

The objective of my blog is to make the latest research accessible to Child Protection, Out of Home Care (OoHC) and Youth Justice (YJ) professionals and carers (i.e. referred collectively as ‘Practitioners’). It aims to answer the question of ‘what works’ for families and children involved the child protection and youth justice systems. The blog promotes accessibility by using plain…

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